Webinar Recording: Dementia Research & Care in Social Media

Click the link below to access the free webinar recording of Dementia Research & Care in Social MediaCreating New KT Opportunities.  This webinar was presented by Dr. Julie Robillard and moderated by Dr. B. Lynn Beattie on March 29 2012.

This event provided an overview of social media concepts, the importance thereof and discussed how social media can be applied in the context of dementia research and care.

http://video.med.ubc.ca/videos/cpd/Recordings/2012-03-29 Dementia KT Research and Care in Social Media.mp4

About the Presenters

Dr. Julie Robillard, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Core for Neuroethics, University of British Columbia. She graduated from the University of British Columbia in 2010 with a PhD in Neuroscience. During her PhD, Dr. Robillard investigated how aging affects a cellular model for learning and memory. Translating basic neuroscience expertise for practical human impact, at the Core she is working on assessing the effectiveness of communication about health information relating to aging and dementia. In addition to her work at UBC, Dr. Robillard volunteers with several science outreach organizations such as the Let’s Talk Science partnership and Science 101 and writes a science blog at www.scientificchick.com.

Dr. B. Lynn Beattie is Professor Emeritus, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia. She is Director of the Clinic for Alzheimer Disease (AD) and Related Disorders at UBC Hospital, Scientific Director of the Centre for Healthy Aging at Providence at Providence Health Care in Vancouver, and a member of the Board of the Pacific Alzheimer Research Foundation.

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